The Tears of Tjilbruke Part 2

 

A half ibis, half man.

His tears falling on the ground and forming sources of water for the souls who inhabit his land.

From grief comes hope. From tears, life.

They sing songs about him. The songs are also poems.

Poems are remembered well. Long after the original indigenous inhabitants had vanished, the generations afterwards could still remember many of the poems of their people.

The poems give meaning to a vast land which to the eyes of the Europeans was – and still is – daunting, monotonous: a terrible emptiness. 

The song poems are maps of the mind….and together, they form another very different idea of Australia.

And so it happens that when Norman B. Tindale meets Ivaritji in the Adelaide Museum in 1927, he asks about the song poem of Tjilbruke. The son of a missionary, he is on a mission. Not a mission to convert others. The mission of a scientist. A mission to change the way Australians look at their country….

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The Tears of Tjilbruke Part 1

 

Her name was Ivaritji.

She was the last one left.

The last member of the Kaurna people who inhabited the area where today’s Adelaide and its sprawling suburbs are situated.

There is a photo of her in the Aboriginal Culture Gallery of the South Australia museum – one of the finest ethnographic displays in the world, thanks largely to the pioneering work of one of Australia’s greatest  anthropologists, Norman B. Tindale.

The photo of Ivaritji was taken by Tindale in 1928 shortly before she died…

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Star Gazing Part 2

 

When I bought my binoculars with the intention of travelling to the deserts of Central Australia, those deserts didn’t seem so far away.

A few days driving, something like that.  

But then the restrictions on travel were ratcheted up – and up – and before I knew it, damn well everything was far away.

One couldn’t go anywhere excepting the supermarket and petrol station.  

Stay at home was the idea.

Home? Anya and I had never actually had a home.

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´Your Country´s Burning!´ – Part 1

It was on a Saturday night in January 2020, shortly after Anya and I had returned from a month of walking in La Palma. We´d arranged to go to Anya´s niece´s place, who´d invited some friends around for the night.    

It was meant to be a pleasant, convivial evening.

But thanks to me, it turned out a bit differently.  

 

It started with flamenco and ended with aboriginal fire stick agriculture.

Quite a distance to travel in a few hours: Spain to Australia.

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